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Meet Joe Black - Wikipedia

Directed by Martin Brest. With Brad Pitt, Anthony Hopkins, Claire Forlani, Jake Weber. Death, who takes the form of a young man, asks a media mogul to act as a. Film: Somewhere inside "Meet Joe Black" is a touching fantasy, though you'd never know it because the people responsible for this appalling. socialgamenews.info: Meet Joe Black [Blu-ray]: Brad Pitt, Anthony Hopkins, Claire Forlani , Jake Weber, Jeffrey Tambor, Martin Brest: Movies & TV.

Susan is confused by the appearance of Joe, believing him to be the young man from the coffee shop, but eventually falls deeply in love with him. Joe is now under the influence of human desires and becomes attracted to her as well. After they make love, Joe asks Susan, "What do we do now? As his last birthday arrives, Bill appeals to Joe to recognize the meaning of true love and all it encompasses, especially honesty and sacrifice.

Joe comes to understand that he must set aside his own desire and allow Susan to live her life. He also helps Bill regain control of his company, exposing Drew's underhanded business dealings to the board by claiming to be an agent of the Internal Revenue Service and threatening to put Drew in jail. At the party Bill makes his peace with his daughters.

Meet Joe Black (1998) - Lightning Could Strike Scene (1/10) - Movieclips

Susan tells Joe that she has loved him ever since that day in the coffee shop. Joe realises that Susan loves the unknown man, not him, and the realization crushes him slightly. Mastering his emotions powerfully he balks at telling Susan who he really is, although she seems to intuit his true identity.

Struggling to comprehend the enormity of the situation, Susan cannot label Joe as Death. She says finally, "You're. He promises her "you will always have what you found in the coffee shop. Fireworks explode in the distance while Susan watches Joe and her father walk out of view.

Susan is stunned as "Joe" reappears alone, bewildered, this time as the young man from the coffee shop. The principal difference that had this initial effect on me was the change in the primary romantic relationship--between Joe and Susan and between Prince Sirki Frederic March and Grazia Evelyn Venable in the original. In the original, it's ambiguous whether Grazia doesn't recognize Sirki for what he really is all along.

She at least never meets him as Sirki rather than Death-as-Sirki. It creates interesting philosophical scenarios about humankind's conception and fear of death; Grazia, who is a bit aloof all along, may be embracing death rather than fearing it, not as something negative, but more metaphysically, as inherent in the idea of life. It removes all of the philosophical points about one's attitude towards death with the exception of William, who is the only one who knows the truth, even in the end, and who implicitly goes through vacillating feelings about death.

However, despite my initial hesitation on the change, I tried to remember my commitment to judge each film on its own terms rather than its relation to other works, and I realized that the relationship set up here is interesting for another reason--it explores public identity in relationships and the tensions that arise through dynamicism of that public identity.

That's a theme throughout the film, not just in its romantic relationships. Pitt has often been criticized for his performance here, but in my opinion, it's perfect for the character s --just as good in its own way as March's turn as Sirki in the original. He's supposed to be a supernatural being who normally relates to the world in a completely different way, but now he's suddenly made corporeal. He doesn't know what to do as a human.

As an entity, he's not daft, lacking power or unknowledgeable about many things, but he's incredibly naive and awkward as a thing of flesh. He's not used to relating to the world in that way. He's not used to making facial expressions. He's never tasted food, and so on.

The change he undergoes in the beginning and end of the film is amazing and shows just how skilled Pitt is. Hopkins and Forlani are of course no slouches, either. Hopkins' ability to go from understated and elegant to manic is put to good use; the role seems tailor-made for him. Forlani, who has a very unusual but intriguingly beautiful face that always looks a bit pouty, gets to pout even more, creating a bizarrely complex but effective character.

The rest of the primary cast is just as good. The end result is a strangely dysfunctional family with a lot of depth. It's much more epic, of course, and that scope, plus the incredible score by Thomas Newman, pushes its emotional effectiveness up a notch. But make sure you do not miss either film.

Both are excellent and unusual. Everyone has their vices and their shortcomings. Whether you are a billionaire with a perfect spouse, a cottage, a beach house, nice cars and wonderful parents or if you are a single parent struggling to get by on measly paycheck, we can all find something that is wrong with life. Such is human nature. But what can we do to remedy that situation.

What can we do to try and ensure that our life gets better? And is it all really that bad? Meet Joe Black is a movie that asks us to look at ourselves and realize that this life is a gift and one that perhaps is taken for granted a little too much. Meet Joe Black asks us to ask ourselves: Anthony Hopkins plays Bill.

Meet Joe Black

Bill is a very successful business man but it is his time. We all have to die one day, it is a part of life. And this is Bill's time. But before he goes, the Grim Reaper pays him a visit and offers him time.

And in exchange Bill will show Death what it is like to be alive. A bit of an oxymoron for sure but true nonetheless. And what happens when Death starts to learn about what makes our life so precious is really something that has to be seen.

Because what we take for granted, he sees as innocent and pure and magical. For instance, peanut butter. Joe Black tastes it and decides that it is the most amazing food that he has ever had in his short existence. And when people are eating their caviar at dinner, he refrains and has more peanut butter. This scene is one of the purest and most honest scenes in the film. Not for what is on the outside, but what it means, what it wants us to see. To me this scene is the microcosm of what the film and what life should be about.

Life is a gift. There are so many wonderful things that we have as human beings that we seem to forget what they are. We are so consumed with other things that at the time seem important but when you look at them closely they are trivial and it's the little things in life that bring us so much joy.

Like peanut butter, aka tossing the ball around with your kids, aka. The point is that life is serious enough and it isn't until others are gone that we fully comprehend that. Brad Pitt is perfect, absolutely perfect as Joe Black. He conveys the innocent wonder and pure joy of discovering human elements like the aforementioned peanut butter and more serious issues like falling in love.

Meet Joe Black has been criticized for its length but like all movies that are three hours plus, there is a reason for that. And that is because it has something to say. Something important to say.

Meet Joe Black | Netflix

Meet Joe Black wants us to look at this film and then look at our lives and realize that there is a lot to live for. You just have to get through all the mist and cloudiness and you'll find it again. There is an innocence about how this movie feels and it is such a wonderful picture. It makes you feel good. Good to be in love if you are good to want to be in love if you are not already and good to be alive.