Phase difference and path relationship quizzes

Wave-Optics - PRADEEP KSHETRAPAL PHYSICS

phase difference and path relationship quizzes

It has a direct relation with phase difference. Phase difference decides the nature of interference pattern but phase difference is found out by. In electronic signaling, phase is a definition of the position of a point in time ( instant) on a waveform cycle. them and questions of this level will not appear in any of the exams/quizzes. Exercise (level X): . dimensions are very complicated – it can trace any path through space. But if the object is . Notice that C is completely arbitrary and has no relation to ω. This is the The phase difference between the second and first motion.

Which probably doesn't answer the question as simply as intended. By AP Ferguson not verified on 14 Jul permalink Also, there can't be no light on the viewing screen - there will be rings of constructive and destructive interference.

The constructive interference has "more light" energy. In addition, the light going out the input port should be opposite in interference pattern due to the phase shifts of the differing numbers of reflections.

phase difference and path relationship quizzes

In the net, no energy is lost or gained By Joe not verified on 14 Jul permalink Joe beat me to it. It's called an interference pattern for a reason. Integrated over the whole surface, the energy in the bright and dark fringes is that of the incoming beams.

By Matt Springer not verified on 14 Jul permalink Glad my question was so inspirational. Those are some of my "stumpers" that I like asking to scientists who you would think would know the answer but haven't really thought about it before.

I was happy to see the 'pyrolysis' answer, and happy to see the example of its common manifestation in cooking. The beam-splitting process is, after all, time-reversible.

phase difference and path relationship quizzes

As several commenters said, if you add together all the light and dark fringes, the energy should remain constant. The same occurs here, except there is really only one "dark fringe" the viewing screen and one "light fringe" returning towards the laser. Add these two fringes together, and the result will remain constant regardless of the position of the mirrors.

By miller not verified on 14 Jul permalink If you move the mirror back by one half wavelength, doesn't that create a total path difference of one full wavelength and thus leave the interference pattern unchanged? Log in to post comments By Anonymous not verified on 14 Jul permalink If you move the mirror back by one half wavelength, doesn't that create a total path difference of one full wavelength and thus leave the interference pattern unchanged?

Log in to post comments By Anonymous not verified on 14 Jul permalink Of course, this is a modern Michelson interferometer. Michelson didn't have lasers for the original. Log in to post comments By APP not verified on 14 Jul permalink The provided answers are a little oversimplified so here's my best guess: From a wave perspective the light arrives out of phase and therefore the two beams cancel each other out. From a particle perspective the photons are still there. They're just not visible due to their out-of-phase wavelengths.

The energy of one beam is essentially being used to make the energy of the other beam invisible but the sum of the energies of the two beams has not changed.

Log in to post comments By Anonymous not verified on 14 Jul permalink To clarify or maybe confuse things a bit: Thus, you don't get a ring pattern, just a single spot of light.

By Chad Orzel not verified on 14 Jul permalink One thing maybe people didn't make fully clear: I always used to wonder, what happens in a symmetrical beam splitter they exist!

In such a case, relative amplitude changes must the same regardless of which way the light enters. Hence I long ago puzzled: I couldn't figure out, what "gave" in this case. Well, a partially silvered mirror will, so Another issue with interferometers and beam splitters is time reversal. The interference such as destructive will produce the same stuff coming out, as was formerly going in. But consider a polarizing beam splitter. They are independent bases.

phase difference and path difference

Anyone ever think of this before? Power is going in. Potentially a lot, but for physics that's not important. Therefore, for energy to be conserved, something is getting hotter.

phase difference and path relationship quizzes

Or, alternately, consider the possibility that your solution is arguing for nonconservation. Which would be a wonderful thing to demonstrate and doubtless make you eternally famous Log in to post comments By D. Sessions not verified on 14 Jul permalink I voted for the destructive interference since the question was asking about where the "light" went. But I believe that if it's a question of where the energy emitted by the laser goes, the laser would see the bright spot configuration as one output impedance, and the other configuration as a different output impedance, similarly to how different antennas manifest themselves to a radio transmitter.

In the second configuration, the laser would be unable to get rid of its input energy and heat up, thus explaining what happens to the energy. Log in to post comments By ME not verified on 14 Jul permalink Consider the half of the light that reflects off the beamsplitter and hits the fixed mirror.

Phase v frequency - Questions and Answers ​in MRI

It bounces back up and hits the beamsplitter again, and gets split again. So half of the half, one quarter, passes through the beamsplitter and hits the viewing screen, while one quarter reflects back to the laser. Similarly, of the half of the original light that passes through the beamsplitter, half of the half will pass through again and proceed to the laser, and half of the half will reflect to the screen. What's the difference between the two quarter-beams that combine on the screen, and the two quarter-beams that return to the laser?

Well, the two quarter-beams that hit the screen have both reflected off the beamsplitter once, and passed through it once. But one of the quarter-beams that returns to the laser has reflected twice and passed no times, while the other has reflected no times and passed twice. Log in to post comments By Bob Hawkins not verified on 14 Jul permalink It goes out at the source. For the light at the detector to be equal to the inbound light, no light must be leaving elsewhere, the source is the only other place it can leave if it isn't absorbed which is ruled out by the "ideal" materialsand the only way we get no light coming back out at the source is if the phases work out such that they cancel heading back to the source.

Phase shift shifts occur both from traveling a distance not evenly divisible by the wavelength and being reflected. Cancelling out the common elements, the net phase shift should be the 2 times differences in phase shift on the paths from the mirrors to the BS. So when the paths are the same, no phase shift and full constructive interference.

When the mirror is moved so that the difference in the phase shift is degrees, full destructive inteference. So the difference in phase shift is 2 times difference in the path lengths from the BS to the mirrors plus 2 times the phase shift from being reflected in the BS.

When n2 is much less than n1 the phase shift for total internal reflection with an angle of incidence of 45 degrees is degrees. Two times that is degrees, which is equivalent towhich gives us differences betweeen the phase shifts within for the light returning at the emitter and the detector being degrees from each other. So it seems like a BS that works via fustrated total internal reflection will exhibit the phase shifts necessary.

It reflected back into the laser, messing with the wavelength of the output light and if it's a diode, at least trying to ruin the laser. Log in to post comments By alkali not verified on 14 Jul permalink This is freshman physics Log in to post comments By Spankmaster S not verified on 14 Jul permalink the net effect of a destructive interference is the same as taking the beam splitter out By milkshake not verified on 14 Jul permalink So, when do you post the answer?

By smijer not verified on 14 Jul permalink I heard on another thread, that I misconstrued the functioning of polarizing beam splitters: I thought it depended on which way it went well, I suppose it can't. So that ends up making sense. I don't know where or how I got a wrong take on a PBS.

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I just scheduled it. I heard on another thread, that I misconstrued the functioning of polarizing beam splitters: The beamsplitter in this example is not a polarizing beamsplitter. If it were, the two beams would have opposite polarizations, and then would not be able to interfere with each other.

By Chad Orzel not verified on 14 Jul permalink The light goes back out where it came from. LIGO, where I did an internship last year. Locate the range of frequencies about the frequency you obtained in part a. You will notice that there is a range of approximately one color about the central frequency you computed above.

The colors outside this range give those in the transmitted light. The color in part a is green. Let's represent the air gap of thickness d to analyze the reflections.: Refer also to fig. Ray 1 undergoes a phase change of upon reflection. Ray 2 undergoes no phase change. A dark band occurs when there is destructive interference: This is the "unusual " condition because of the phase change for ray 1.

Note that the wavelength is for light in a vacuum since the gap between the glass is air. Calculate m at the position of maximum thickness on the left end using the value of d at that location.

Note that there is destructive interference at the position of zero thickness on the right end since at that point ray 1 is exactly out phase with ray 2. Therefore you must add the number 1 to the value of m you compute. The air gap varies between zero at the right end and the maximum d at the left end. Look at fig P Let L be the length of each diagonal.

Now, the path difference between the reflected ray and the direct wave is: Compute this path difference.